Monday, November 28, 2011

November 29, 1993 Release of the “Dram” Banknote as National Currency for Armenia - Today in History Through Collectibles


On this pivotal day in 1993,the Republic of Armenia officially cut its last and most important link to the Soviet Union by adopting the “Dram” banknote as its official currency.


This week marks the eighteen-year anniversary of the memorable event that began the Republic of Armenia’s economic independence with the release of the intricately exquisite “Dram”banknotes.  Colnect features these rarecollectibles in all of their glory.

These historic documents come out of a unique country that borders Turkey and is located at a crossroads of three important regions, as the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Western Asia come together around its lands.  The Republic of Armenia’s “Dram” is not just a symbol for the fall of the Soviet Union, but is more one for their newly emerged national identity.

Of the first banknotes to beput into circulation in the Republic of Armenia, there were eight denominations:  ten, twenty-five, fifty,one hundred, two hundred, five hundred, one thousand, and five thousand “Dram”.

An example of a 500 note is pictured here and shows the gorgeous blue, violet, and green color scheme interlaced with woven designs and a classic Armenian colonnade.

It is an inspiring design and a featured member of the Colnect banknote catalog that is worth remembering.

Many of the items that collectors on Colnect collect are in fact associated with certain historical events that have taken place over time. This applies especially to Stamps, Phone Cards, Coins and Banknotes. To commemorate these special historical events, countries release special issues of these items that depict images and information relevant to these events.

Through our “Today in History Through Collectibles” Blog we will highlight special events in history by featuring Collectible items from our Colnect Catalogs that are associated with historical events that took place on specific days in history.

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